OKAPI360

RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par Silver le Jeu 12 Fév - 4:33






En avant plan sur la photo, Condola Rashad (La fille de Phylicia Rashad , qui joue le role de Claire Huxtable dans "Cosby show" et Ahmad Rashad, le journaliste de la NBA qui etait connu comme l'interviewer #1 de Michael Jordan) joue le role principal dans cette piece theatrale qui rend hommage aux femmes congolaises violees pendant la guerre a l'est.


http://www.mtc-nyc.org/current-season/ruined/index.htm

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/arts/2009/02/11/2009-02-11_fallen_women_fight_for_survival_in_ruine.html

Silver

Nombre de messages : 2335
Date d'inscription : 04/06/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par *Maadox le Jeu 12 Fév - 15:28

do you have a schedule for this? i would love to see one!

*Maadox

Nombre de messages : 129
Date d'inscription : 16/11/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par CRyma le Ven 13 Fév - 11:00

je vis definitivement sur le mauvais coté de la frontiere. il n y a qu a NY qu'on peut voir ce genre de chose.

CRyma

Nombre de messages : 1208
Age : 116
Localisation : ........ quelque part .......
Date d'inscription : 13/06/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par Silver le Mer 18 Fév - 1:06

*Maadox a écrit:do you have a schedule for this? i would love to see one!

Here is the schedule: http://www.mtc-nyc.org/current-season/ruined/tickets.htm

They also have a "The Congo" section with a lot of links: http://www.mtc-nyc.org/current-season/ruined/links.htm

Silver

Nombre de messages : 2335
Date d'inscription : 04/06/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par *Maadox le Mer 18 Fév - 3:07

thanks silver...i am trying to understand the schedule...but i am not really getting it...do you know if it will still be running like after april? coz i can't go no where until April 15th...

*Maadox

Nombre de messages : 129
Date d'inscription : 16/11/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par Silver le Jeu 19 Fév - 2:31

Tue 7, Wed – Sat 8, Wed, Sat & Sun 2, Sun 7

Madoff, oh pardon! Maadox, je pense bien que le 7,8,2 et 7 stand pour 7pm, 8pm....etc. Apres le 15 Avril? Humm! Ca sent les taxes. Avec tout le $$$ que tu vas te faire , tu peux m'amener voir la piece. Wink

Silver

Nombre de messages : 2335
Date d'inscription : 04/06/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par Silver le Mer 22 Avr - 1:59


Ca fait tres plaisir. LYNN NOTTAGE, l'auteur de RUINS vient de gagner le PULITZER (surement le prix le plus prestigieux qu'un journaliste puisse obtenir ). Elle dit qu'elle espere que tout ca aider a faire connaitre le probleme qu'elle souleve dans "RUINS", a savoir la violence provoquee par la guerre a l'est de la RDC. Elle compte aussi donner une partie de son $10 000 (son prix) a une organization qui s'occupe de ces victimes de la guerre de l'est.
Que Dieu te benisse ma.




Playwright Lynn Nottage won a Pulitzer Prize yesterday for her play Ruined which tells the story of the women of the Congo whose lives have been “ruined” by systemic rape and torture.

Nottage was inspired by Berthold Brecht’s Mother Courage to tell the story of women who get forgotten once the headlines cease (if there were any headlines to begin with.) If you want to learn more on the topic check out Lisa Jackson’s documentary, The Greatest Silence: Rape in the Congo.

Here’s what Nottage said to the Daily News about her intensions behind the play: “I hope it will raise awareness about the issues that the play raises. The war ended in 2002, but the conflict and violence against women continues.”

She will share part of her prize (which she probably desperately needs since playwrighting is not very lucrative) with the Panzi Hospital in the Congo which performs reconstructive surgeries on rape survivors.

I can’t say it enough- AWARDS MATTER. The Pulitzers and all awards matter to producers and to theatre goers. It’s much easier to produce a play on a difficult topic lie rape in the Congo if it comes with the words “pulitzer prize winning.” And it will be easier for Nottage to get her next play produced because she won the Pulitzer. That just the facts.

This year, interestingly, a woman was going to be honored in this category. The other finalists were Gina Gionfriddo’s Becky Shaw, Lin-Manuel Miranda and Quiara Alegría Hudes’ In the Heights,(ok the last one was a male-female partnership,but you get the point.)

Laura Collin-Hughes wrote a great piece on why these awards mattered that worth referencing here:

The Pulitzer isn’t important in itself; it matters because of its ripple effect. Quite simply, winners and finalists get noticed. They get produced. The Pulitzer changes the composition of our canon, the stories we as a culture tell ourselves. Women’s voices need to be a much more significant part of that.

And yet most of the time when the lights go down in a theater, we listen to a male playwright — generally a white male playwright — telling a story. Usually, that story is primarily about a man, or men, despite the fact that women are far more likely than men to attend musicals and straight plays.

Take Broadway, for example. A Broadway run — not necessarily a successful run, just a run — is a marker of success that, like a Pulitzer, gets a play produced elsewhere, sometimes all over the world. Broadway is also where the money is in theater, and that’s no small reason artists have it in their sights.

But male writers and composers have a far, far better chance of seeing their names in lights there. Right now on Broadway, an anemic seven out of 37 shows, or 18.9 percent, have female playwrights, book writers, composers or lyricists. One of them is “In the Heights,” with its book by Hudes, who was also a 2007 Pulitzer finalist for her play, “Elliot, a Soldier’s Fugue.”

In fact, the only current Broadway show that’s wholly written by women is “9 to 5,” which has music and lyrics by Dolly Parton and a book by Patricia Resnick. Yes, French hit-maker Yasmina Reza has a new crowd-pleaser in “God of Carnage,” but her translator, Christopher Hampton (whose own Broadway play, “The Philanthropist,” is in previews), is and has been very much a partner in her English-language success.

Off-Broadway isn’t much better for women, as female playwrights pointed out last fall when they banded together in protest of seriously ugly numbers. According to The New York Times, the women argued “that their male counterparts in the 2008-9 season are being produced at 14 of the largest Off Broadway institutions at four times the rate that women are.”

This place where women fill most of the seats, then, is a weirdly blinkered world, its view focused by men. There’s seldom room for plays like “Ruined,” which is largely about the atrocities that happen to women and girls — African women and girls — in wartime. (It’s currently at Manhattan Theatre Club in a production by Kate Whoriskey.) There’s seldom room for plays by women at all. If not for the 2002 Pulitzer, there probably wouldn’t have been much of a welcome on the nation’s stages for Suzan-Lori Parks’ “Topdog/Underdog.” If not for that year’s shortlist, fewer people would have seen Dael Orlandersmith’s “Yellowman” and Rebecca Gilman’s “The Glory of Living.” But high-profile prizes help immensely.

Silver

Nombre de messages : 2335
Date d'inscription : 04/06/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par ANAKIN le Dim 26 Avr - 15:05

Silver a écrit:
Ca fait tres plaisir. LYNN NOTTAGE, l'auteur de RUINS vient de gagner le PULITZER (surement le prix le plus prestigieux qu'un journaliste puisse obtenir ). Elle dit qu'elle espere que tout ca aider a faire connaitre le probleme qu'elle souleve dans "RUINS", a savoir la violence provoquee par la guerre a l'est de la RDC. Elle compte aussi donner une partie de son $10 000 (son prix) a une organization qui s'occupe de ces victimes de la guerre de l'est.
Que Dieu te benisse ma.




Playwright Lynn Nottage won a Pulitzer Prize yesterday for her play Ruined which tells the story of the women of the Congo whose lives have been “ruined” by systemic rape and torture.

Nottage was inspired by Berthold Brecht’s Mother Courage to tell the story of women who get forgotten once the headlines cease (if there were any headlines to begin with.) If you want to learn more on the topic check out Lisa Jackson’s documentary, The Greatest Silence: Rape in the Congo.

Here’s what Nottage said to the Daily News about her intensions behind the play: “I hope it will raise awareness about the issues that the play raises. The war ended in 2002, but the conflict and violence against women continues.”

She will share part of her prize (which she probably desperately needs since playwrighting is not very lucrative) with the Panzi Hospital in the Congo which performs reconstructive surgeries on rape survivors.

I can’t say it enough- AWARDS MATTER. The Pulitzers and all awards matter to producers and to theatre goers. It’s much easier to produce a play on a difficult topic lie rape in the Congo if it comes with the words “pulitzer prize winning.” And it will be easier for Nottage to get her next play produced because she won the Pulitzer. That just the facts.

This year, interestingly, a woman was going to be honored in this category. The other finalists were Gina Gionfriddo’s Becky Shaw, Lin-Manuel Miranda and Quiara Alegría Hudes’ In the Heights,(ok the last one was a male-female partnership,but you get the point.)

Laura Collin-Hughes wrote a great piece on why these awards mattered that worth referencing here:

The Pulitzer isn’t important in itself; it matters because of its ripple effect. Quite simply, winners and finalists get noticed. They get produced. The Pulitzer changes the composition of our canon, the stories we as a culture tell ourselves. Women’s voices need to be a much more significant part of that.

And yet most of the time when the lights go down in a theater, we listen to a male playwright — generally a white male playwright — telling a story. Usually, that story is primarily about a man, or men, despite the fact that women are far more likely than men to attend musicals and straight plays.

Take Broadway, for example. A Broadway run — not necessarily a successful run, just a run — is a marker of success that, like a Pulitzer, gets a play produced elsewhere, sometimes all over the world. Broadway is also where the money is in theater, and that’s no small reason artists have it in their sights.

But male writers and composers have a far, far better chance of seeing their names in lights there. Right now on Broadway, an anemic seven out of 37 shows, or 18.9 percent, have female playwrights, book writers, composers or lyricists. One of them is “In the Heights,” with its book by Hudes, who was also a 2007 Pulitzer finalist for her play, “Elliot, a Soldier’s Fugue.”

In fact, the only current Broadway show that’s wholly written by women is “9 to 5,” which has music and lyrics by Dolly Parton and a book by Patricia Resnick. Yes, French hit-maker Yasmina Reza has a new crowd-pleaser in “God of Carnage,” but her translator, Christopher Hampton (whose own Broadway play, “The Philanthropist,” is in previews), is and has been very much a partner in her English-language success.

Off-Broadway isn’t much better for women, as female playwrights pointed out last fall when they banded together in protest of seriously ugly numbers. According to The New York Times, the women argued “that their male counterparts in the 2008-9 season are being produced at 14 of the largest Off Broadway institutions at four times the rate that women are.”

This place where women fill most of the seats, then, is a weirdly blinkered world, its view focused by men. There’s seldom room for plays like “Ruined,” which is largely about the atrocities that happen to women and girls — African women and girls — in wartime. (It’s currently at Manhattan Theatre Club in a production by Kate Whoriskey.) There’s seldom room for plays by women at all. If not for the 2002 Pulitzer, there probably wouldn’t have been much of a welcome on the nation’s stages for Suzan-Lori Parks’ “Topdog/Underdog.” If not for that year’s shortlist, fewer people would have seen Dael Orlandersmith’s “Yellowman” and Rebecca Gilman’s “The Glory of Living.” But high-profile prizes help immensely.


CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!

ANAKIN

Nombre de messages : 392
Date d'inscription : 25/06/2008

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: RUINED- une piece theatrale inspiree par les evenements au KIVU

Message par Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum